Medical Abortion in Britain and Ireland: Let’s Join the 21st Century!

RH Reality Check

By Marge Berer, Reproductive Health Matters

February 16, 2011 – 8:02am

Medical abortion – popularly known as the abortion pill – has been in the news almost non-stop for several months now in both Britain and Ireland, though for very different reasons. That’s good news because more women are getting to hear about it. Although the method has been around since the late 1980s, most women didn’t start hearing about it until the last ten years or so. But as it’s become more known, so has controversy begun to brew around it. Why? Because the abortion pill potentially puts the control over abortion into women’s hands, and a lot of conservative men and women aren’t sure they like that.

Medical abortion, when used from the time a woman first misses her period until up to 9 weeks of pregnancy (dated from the first day of the last menstrual period), is more than 95% effective, and the earlier it is used, the closer to 100% effective it is. The method consists of two kinds of medication.

First, mifepristone (one 200mg pill) is taken by mouth, swallowed with some water. Then, misoprostol (four pills of 200mcg each) is used 24–48 hours later. These 4 pills can be inserted high up in the vagina, which a woman can do herself, or a nurse or doctor can do for her. Or, they can be taken buccally, that is, placed inside her mouth, two on the inside of each cheek, where they will slowly start to melt and should remain for up to 30 minutes, and then whatever is left should be swallowed with water. Within 4-5 hours later, the woman will (in almost all cases) have a miscarriage.

Spontaneous miscarriages almost always happen at home; women cope with them. There will be menstruation-like bleeding and fluids, but far heavier than a period, more with every week of pregnancy, often with clots. When the embryo is passed with the bleeding, the bleeding will slowly become lighter. It is likely to continue for several days, or somewhat longer, and then gradually stop. The woman will experience cramps and commonly nausea, and she should take ibuprofen for the pain when the cramping starts and more when needed.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.
About Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.