Georgia State University: Research shows brain changes in adolescent males

Finchannel

06/01/2011 14:16

The FINANCIAL — Every parent knows that teenagers, who undergo changes in hormones during puberty, are often fraught with drama.

Now, a Georgia State University scientist has found that those hormones in males may be key to changes in a part of the brain responsible for social behaviors.

Bradley Cooke, assistant professor of neuroscience at GSU, has found that in male Siberian hamsters, a part of the brain called the medial nucleus of the amygdala increased by nearly 25 percent during puberty. The results have been published in a new study in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology.

The increase in the size of the brain region was accompanied by an increase in the size of individual nerve cells, called neurons, and there was a strong trend towards more neurons overall. In addition, the connections between neurons, called synapses, were found to have increased as well.

“Taken together, these findings indicate that the medial amygdala is reorganized during puberty,” said Cooke, a member of GSU’s Neuroscience Institute.

The growth of the medial nucleus of the amygdala, responsible for changes in aggression and other behaviors, is believed to be related to the rising levels of testosterone during puberty, he said.

“This makes sense because the medial nucleus of the amygdala is sensitive to testosterone, and is packed with receptors for this hormone,” Cooke explained.

Due to the difference in hormones between males and females, the growth of this brain region is most likely not the same in females, he said.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.