More Questions About Gardasil®

A Recent CNN Article lead with this headline…

Gardasil® Deaths, Gardasil® Side Effects, Gardasil® Paralysis –

Is the HPV Vaccine Given to Prevent Cervical Cancer Causing More Medical Problems?

A vaccine designed to prevent cervical cancer is coming under fresh scrutiny amid thousands of complaints linking it to a range of health problems.

Gardasil® has been the subject of 7,802 “adverse event” reports from the time the Food and Drug Administration approved its use two years ago, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Girls and women have blamed the vaccine for causing ailments from nausea to paralysis — even death. Fifteen deaths were reported to the FDA, and 10 were confirmed, but the CDC says none of the 10 were linked to the vaccine. The CDC says it continues to study the reports of illness.

Gardasil prevents the spread of human papillomavirus, known as HPV — a sexually transmitted virus that can cause cervical cancer in a relatively small number of girls and women.

The vaccine’s manufacturer, Merck & Co. Inc., says it has distributed more than 26 million Gardasil® vaccines worldwide, including nearly 16 million in the United States. It estimates that 8 million girls and women have received the vaccine in the United States since June 2006. V

Two girls allege in court that the vaccine made them sick.

One — Jesalee Parsons of Broken Bow, Oklahoma — got the shot at age 13.

Jesalee’s lawyer, Michael McLaren, said she got the shot on February 27, 2007 and soon developed a fever and felt pain. The next day, he said, Jesalee felt pain in her chest and abdomen.

Her mother, Laura Parsons, said Jesalee spent weeks in the hospital and underwent two surgeries after developing pancreatitis. She says the federal government should have studied the drug more before approving its use.

“I just feel let down by the government,” Parsons said.

Merck says it could be a coincidence that the girls got sick after receiving the vaccine.

The company said in a statement that an adverse event report “does not mean that a causal relationship between an event and vaccination has been established — just that the event occurred after vaccination.”

Merck said it would continue to evaluate reports of adverse reactions. It said it “updates product labels with new safety information as appropriate.”

Video Watch more on complications linked to Gardasil »

For Full Article and more video go to:

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/conditions/07/07/cervical.cancer.vaccine/

A sincere thank you to major media outlets, CNN, the Washington Post and the New York Times, for following and reporting the Gardasil® adverse events and asking probing questions about the safety and effectiveness of this aggressively-marketed Merck product.

PG

Author: H. Sandra Chevalier-Batik

I started the Inconvenient Woman Blog in 2007, and am the product of a long line of inconvenient women. The matriarchal line is French-Canadian, Roman Catholic, with a very feisty Irish great-grandmother thrown in for sheer bloody mindedness. I am a research analyst and author who has made her living studying technical data, and developing articles, training materials, books and web content. Tracking through statistical data, and oblique cross-references to find the relevant connections that identifies a problem, or explains a path of action, is my passion. I love clearly delineating the magic questions of knowledge: Who, What, Why, When, Where and for How Much, Paid to Whom. My life lessons: listen carefully, question with boldness, and personally verify the answers. I look at America through the appreciative eyes of an immigrant, and an amateur historian; the popular and political culture is a ceaseless fascination. I have no impressive initials after my name. I’m merely an observer and a chronicler, an inconvenient woman who asks questions, and sometimes encourages others to look at things differently.