Hormones Linked to Cheating Behaviors

Holy Hormones Journal: How many people do you know who lie, and cheat? Who are double-dealing – who exploit others – who are nefarious and fraudulent? And now science is showing that those types of behaviors – that drive us crazy – make us fearful – even harm us – are due to hormone imbalance; higher levels of testosterone and chronic cortisol stress.

How many of us have had cheating partners – or even cheated ourselves? How many of us have been hurt and shamed by these behaviors – wondering how 08.03.15 Signs of a cheating spousecould I have gotten involved with this type of man or woman?

How many of us have kids who lie, cheat and steal… and we wonder how they could have turned out this way.

Well, it turns out it is not the type of person – it is the state of their hormone balance; the state of their health; the state of their well being.

Hormones influence behavior – period.

Is it possible that as we all become more hormonally imbalanced we will see more of this behavior – yes!

No more couples and kids therapy – get to an endocrinologist – and focus on the root cause of the imbalance. Your hormones. Those chemical messages that stimulate your neuro-endocrine-immune system. They rule the roost.

Hormones influence unethical behavior, experts say

Date: July 28, 2015

Source: University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Summary: Hormones play a two-part role in encouraging and reinforcing cheating and other unethical behavior, according to new research. With cheating 08.03.15 ethics2scandals a persistent threat on college campuses and financial fraud costing businesses more than $3.7 trillion annually, researchers looked to hormones for more answers, specifically the reproductive hormone testosterone and the stress hormone cortisol.

Hormones play a two-part role in encouraging and reinforcing cheating and other unethical behavior, according to research from Harvard University and The University of Texas at Austin.

With cheating scandals a persistent threat on college campuses and financial fraud costing businesses more than $3.7 trillion annually, UT Austin and Harvard researchers looked to hormones for more answers, specifically the reproductive hormone testosterone and the stress hormone cortisol.

According to the study, the endocrine system plays a dual role in unethical acts. First, elevated hormone levels predict likelihood of cheating. Then, a change of hormone levels during the act reinforces the behavior.

“Although the science of hormones and behavior dates back to the early 19th century, only recently has research revealed just how powerful and pervasive the influence of the endocrine system is on human behavior,” said the corresponding author and UT Austin professor of psychology Robert Josephs.

Researchers asked 117 participants to complete a math test, grade it themselves and self-report the number of correctly completed problems. The more problems they got correct, the more money they would earn.

From salivary samples collected before and after the test, researchers found that individuals with elevated levels of testosterone and cortisol were more likely to overstate the number of correctly solved problems.

“Elevated testosterone decreases the fear of punishment while increasing sensitivity to reward. Elevated cortisol is linked to an uncomfortable state of chronic stress that can be extremely debilitating,” Josephs said. “Testosterone furnishes the courage to cheat, and elevated cortisol provides a reason to cheat.”

Additionally, participants who cheated showed lowered levels of cortisol and reported reductions in emotional distress after the test, as if cheating provided some sort of stress relief.

Read full article…

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.