Addressing The Vaccine Confidence Gap: More Research Needed Globally On Local Factors Influencing Public Trust In Vaccines

[Note from SaneVax: With all due respect to the authors, medical consumers around the globe are only asking for four things when it comes to vaccines and vaccination practices – Safe, Affordable, Necessary and Effective – based on sound science. The day those four criteria are assured is the day there will no longer be a ‘confidence gap’ regarding vaccines.]

 Medical News Today/The Lancet
June 9, 2011

In the fifth and final paper in the Series, Dr Heidi J Larson (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK) and colleagues analyse the complex range of factors that are causing loss of public confidence in vaccines: the so-called vaccine confidence gap. The authors say: “The vaccine community demands rigorous evidence on vaccine efficacy and safety and technical and operational feasibility when introducing a new vaccine, but has been negligent in demanding equally rigorous research to understand the psychological, social, and political factors that affect public trust in vaccines.”

They add: “Public decision making related to vaccine acceptance is neither driven by scientific nor economic evidence alone, but is also driven by a mix of psychological, sociocultural, and political factors, all of which need to be understood and taken into account by policy and other decision makers. Public trust in vaccines is highly variable and building trust depends on understanding perceptions of vaccines and vaccine risks, historical experiences, religious or political affiliations, and socioeconomic status.”

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PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.