Tampon-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome Still Claims Lives

Holy Hormones Honey! Tampon-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome is alive and well – and still claiming lives. Amazing that a federal bill  to determine whether dioxins, synthetic fibres, and other additives are present in femcare products and to assess their health risks never got out of the subcommittee.   Guess the fem hygiene industry is a powerful lobbyist just like Pharma. I think it is pretty common sense that dioxins, fibres and other additives in the vagina could be very dangerous – especially during the paramenstrum when immunity is low to begin with.

Amy Raye’s Legacy

Society for Menstrual Cycle Research
re:Cycling
July 3rd, 2012
by Elizabeth Kissling

Longtime readers of re:Cycling are probably familiar with the story of Amy Rae Elifritz, who died from tampon-induced Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) in 2010, and became the namesake of ARE in You ARE Loved, the educational foundation started by her mother, Lisa Elifritz. This summer marks the second anniversary of Amy’s death, and the Elifritz family is suing the hospital where she was treated for medical malpractice, and the makers of Playtex tampons for negligence and liability.

Details of the suit are not available due to Indiana’s malpractice laws, but the two-part investigative report about TSS conducted last year by Indianapolis television station WISH-TV8 is available here (part 1) and here (part 2). Phillip Tierno, the microbiologist who first identified the connection between synthetic fibres in tampons and TSS more than 30 years ago, is among those interviewed.

The findings of the WISH-TV8 investigative team, led by reporter Karen Hensel, inspired Rep. Carolyn B. Moloney (D-NY) to introduce the Robin Danielson Act to Congress for a fourth time, on June 23, 2011. Moloney first introduced a similar bill, called the Tampon Safety and Research Act, in 1997. The bill would have required independent research on tampon safety, under the auspices of the NIH, to determine whether dioxins, synthetic fibres, and other additives are present in femcare products and to assess their health risks. The bill was introduced in 1997 and in 1999, but never got out of subcommittee. In 2001, it was renamed “The Robin Danielson Act”, after a woman who died of tampon-related TSS in 1998, in hopes that removing the word “tampon” from the title might speed its progress. The bill was introduced again in early 2003 and quickly moved to the House Subcommittee on Health, where it slowly died. The 2011 edition has so far acquired three co-sponsors and been referred to the House Subcommittee on Health, where it currently rests.

The Danielson act would also authorize and compel the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to develop a “program to collect, analyze, and make available data on toxic shock syndrome, including data on the causes of such syndrome”. Making a compelling case for the bill is complicated by the fact that there are presently no national data on cases of TSS in the U.S. TSS is a nationally notifiable disease that states must report to the CDC, but reporting by the states is voluntary. Amy Rae Elifritz’s home state of Indiana did not begin collecting data on TSS until 2009.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.