Have we found key to autism?

Scientists hail ‘monumental’ breakthrough that could help millions

MailOnline
United Kingdom

By Fiona Macrae
Last updated at 1:25 AM on 29th April 2009

Scientists have pinpointed rogue genes that could unlock the riddle of autism.

The breakthrough has been hailed as a ‘monumental achievement’ that could revolutionise understanding and treatment of the condition.

Experts have compared it to the pivotal cancer research of the 1970s, which began unravelling the disease’s genetic causes.

Autism and related conditions such as Asperger’s syndrome affect at least one in 100 UK children, and some research puts the figure as high as one in 60. Even the lower estimate is ten times the level of 30 years ago.

With the causes unclear, children are usually treated with a combination of speech, behavioural and other therapies. Drugs can be given to control symptoms such as aggression or hyperactivity, but these cannot be cured.

Now three major studies have identified specific genetic links to autism, related to the development and ‘wiring’ of the brain.

Last night a spokesman for the National Autistic Society said the landmark research could pave the way to improving life for hundreds of thousands of Britons with autism and their families.

Now three major studies have identified specific genetic links to autism, related to the development and ‘wiring’ of the brain.

Last night a spokesman for the National Autistic Society said the landmark research could pave the way to improving life for hundreds of thousands of Britons with autism and their families.

The National Autistic Society said: ‘Autism is a serious, lifelong condition which affects the way people understand and communicate with the world around them.

‘Without the right support, it can have a profound effect on individuals and families.

‘We warmly welcome authoritative research which might add to our knowledge and understanding.’

Cases of autism have increased significantly over the past 40 years at least partly due to better detection and diagnosis.

Earlier this month, a study led by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen at Cambridge University’s Autism Research Centre, estimated that for every three cases of autism detected, another two go undiagnosed.

It suggested that 216,000 children in the UK could be suffering from an autistic condition.

Looking after sufferers already costs the UK £28billion a year.

Comment from Leslie

Sounds like damage control to me.  We have already determined that childhood vaccinations cause brain damage – with the heavy metals and other mass amounts of poisons that are added as adjuvants – at a time when the development of  genes is most important in brain functioning in babies and children.

This also seems similar to “free radicals” and the cancerous cells that inhibit our bodies because we are so overly toxic.

Autism is being cured – naturally – ask Jenny McCarthy – and any chiropractor that focuses on  strengthening the immune system and detoxs the body of poisons.

This may be a monumental breakthrough – but it is still not addressing the root cause. Nice try but no bananas…

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.