Hidden government papers expose lies about measles vaccines for infants

Natural News

Tuesday, September 21, 2010 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer

British government policy on measles vaccination for children has changed for no discernible reason notes Christina England, writing on vactruth.com, citing an internal document from 1968.

The document, titled “Notes On the Use and Storage of Measles Vaccine (Live Attenuated) for Routine Vaccines,” clearly states in Section 7 that the vaccine should not be given to children under the age of nine months old. According to the paper’s authors, the presence of maternal antibodies in the blood of such children interferes with the action of the vaccine, making it ineffective. Instead, the government recommended vaccination at the age of two after vaccination for diptheria, polio, tetanus and whooping cough.

England contrasts this with the ongoing push for earlier measles vaccination, most recently highlighted with a study that found almost no maternal antibodies present in children’s bodies by the age of six months.

She also draws attention to Section 6 of the government document, which acknowledges that “mild febrile reactions and transient rashes may be expected to follow the administration of the vaccine in a substantial proportion of cases” but that “the Committee on Safety of Drugs … does not however, wish to receive reports of mild febrile reactions and rashes associated with the use of this vaccine.”

Section 8 then goes on to recommend that in order to reduce the risk of adverse effects, “an interval of three to four weeks should normally be allowed to elapse between the administration of measles vaccine and any other vaccine, whichever is given first.”

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