Why I have prescribed progesterone as a nerve repair agent for years

WeeksMD.com

By Dr. Brad Weeks

Progesterone is one of the most exciting things we have coming out,” said Lori Shutter, director of neurocritical care at the University of Cincinnati Hospital, one of the 17 study sites. “You can’t undo the initial injury, but you hope to reduce the secondary injury, and progesterone may have a role in reducing the inflammatory process.”

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124570941550138741.html

Wall Street Journal

JUNE 23, 2009

Brain-Trauma Study Set

By THOMAS M. BURTON

Several potential treatments for brain injury and stroke have failed in recent clinical studies, but one improbable therapy — the hormone progesterone — continues to show promise in warding off brain damage from head trauma and stroke.

In the latest development, the National Institutes of Health are expected Tuesday to begin funding a study evaluating the hormone in more than 1,100 emergency patients with moderate to severe head trauma.

This study will get under way at 17 hospitals in 15 states around the U.S. and is expected to last up to five years at a projected cost of up to $28 million. It will be the pivotal study of whether the naturally occurring hormone progesterone, injected into patients within hours of severe accidents, can lower deaths and reduce paralysis and cognitive damage. It will be the definitive test of earlier animal research conducted over a quarter century by Emory University brain researcher Donald G.Stein, the subject of a page-one Wall Street Journal article two years ago.

“The extensive laboratory science and preliminary clinical research is highly promising, but not definitive,” said David Wright, the Emory emergency-medicine doctor who will be principal investigator of the research. “This study is the ultimate test.”

In recent years, various potential neurological treatments for stroke and brain injury have failed, such as the use in ambulances of high-concentration saline to relieve cranial pressure in brain-injury patients, and cooling procedures, or hypothermia, in pediatric brain-injury patients. These are only some of the latest disappointments in finding potential “neuro-protective” agents.

As a result, the idea that progesterone might be beneficial is greeted with both skepticism and considerable hope.

“Progesterone is one of the most exciting things we have coming out,” said Lori Shutter, director of neurocritical care at the University of Cincinnati Hospital, one of the 17 study sites. “You can’t undo the initial injury, but you hope to reduce the secondary injury, and progesterone may have a role in reducing the inflammatory process.”

In the past few years, Dr. Stein’s lab at Emory has focused on using progesterone in treating clot-caused strokes, the most common form of stroke and one that is estimated to afflict more than 80% of the 700,000 U.S. stroke patients annually. In laboratory rats, progesterone, derived from yams but also present as a human hormone, has shown success in Dr. Stein’s lab in reducing the size of the brain tissue that is destroyed after a stroke.

MORE…

Comment from Leslie

Wonder if progesterone might also work on vaccine brain damaged children.

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.