About Brain Injury

Headway East Lankshire
United Kingdom

Headway Blackburn with Darwen was established 3 years ago . It is organised by people who have experience of caring for or who have an interest in an acquired brain injured people. Headway Blackburn with Darwen is a branch of the National Charity “Headway” and its objectives and aims are to support the survivors of brain injury, their families and careers.

The brain is the control centre for everything we think, feel, and do. It is a somewhat fragile structure encased in a hard shell (the skull), so it is not surprising that any injury to the head can result in brain damage. Any damage to the brain can have profound and devastating effects on a person’s ability to manage their life.

Brain injury is often known as the “hidden disability because the problems which arise from an injury to the brain are not always obvious to another person. Other people can see and often understand the limitations caused by a physical disability, but difficulties with thinking skills and behavioural changes are often misunderstood.

Some of the most common difficulties experienced following a brain injury are:

* Lack of insight
* Personality changes
* Inappropriate behaviour
* Poor perception, recognition and judgement
* Lack of initiative
* Fatigue
* Physical disabilities
* Slowed responses
* Loss of physical sensations
* Poor concentration
* Poor planning and problem solving skills
* Inability to understand and communicate
* Poor memory
* Slow or slurred speech
* Overly talkative

Understandably if you experience one or more of the above difficulties, it will affect how you manage your day- to-day life. Even mild brain injury can change your ability to work and your lifestyle.

The brain is the control centre for everything we think, feel, and do. It is a somewhat fragile structure encased in a hard shell (the skull), so it is not surprising that any injury to the head can result in brain damage. Any damage to the brain can have profound and devastating effects on a person’s ability to manage their life.

Brain injury is often known as the “hidden disability” because the problems which arise from an injury to the brain are not always obvious to another person. Other people can see and often understand the limitations caused by a physical disability, but difficulties with thinking skills and behavioural changes are often misunderstood.

Some of the most common difficulties experienced following a brain injury are:

* Lack of insight
* Personality changes
* Inappropriate behaviour
* Poor perception, recognition and judgement
* Lack of initiative
* Fatigue
* Physical disabilities
* Slowed responses
* Loss of physical sensations
* Poor concentration
* Poor planning and problem solving skills
* Inability to understand and communicate
* Poor memory
* Slow or slurred speech
* Overly talkative

Understandably if you experience one or more of the above difficulties, it will affect how you manage your day- to-day life. Even mild brain injury can change your ability to work and your lifestyle.

Brain injury: A Definition

Acquired Brain Injury is defined by the United Kingdom Acquired Brain Injury Forum (UKABIF) as follows:

A non-degenerative injury to the brain that has occurred since birth. It can be caused by an external physical force or be metabolic derangement. The term ‘acquired brain injury’ included traumatic brain injuries such as open or closed head injuries such as those caused by strokes and other vascular accidents, tumours, infectious diseases, hypoxia, metabolic disorder (e.g. liver and kidney disease or diabetic coma and toxic products taken into the body through inhalation or ingestion. Currently the term does not include brain injuries that are congenital or produced by birth trauma.
Brain injury is not a disease.

Brain injury is defined as a loss of brain function caused by:

* Accident
* Road accident
* Sport or leisure pursuits
* Work related accidents
* Assaults
* Poisoning
* Drinking too much alcohol
* Overuse of prescribed drugs
* Use of illegal drugs
* Petrol and chemical sniffing
* Stroke
* Rupture of a blood vessel in the brain
* Blockage of blood supply to the brain
* Brain tumours
* Cancerous
* Non-cancerous
* Infections
* Meningitis
* Encephalitis
* Lack of oxygen
* Near drowning
* Severe asthma attack
* Lack of blood flow to the brain

A brain injury can have very serious effects on the lives of people who suffer the injury and those who support and assist them.

MORE…

Comment from Leslie

Well, I think that Gardasil girls and the Autistic children of the world certainly fit into this profile.

Brain injuries are more common than we think.  Whereas we can see a broken arm or leg in a cast etc…sometimes it is hard to understand that a person is brain injured.

I was married to a man with a severe brain injury for a long time.  It was difficult at best.  One time when he agreed to get counseling and we went to a Brain Injury Recovery Center – they handed us a list of brain injury symptoms.  They were so similar to “Batterer” profiles in domestic violence/date rape scenarios I was floored.  My first response was to ask if a study had ever been conducted between brain injured victims and batterers.  At that time the correlation had not been made.  I do hope that it has been made today….for all involved.

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.