First Gender Inequality – Now Vaccination Inequality?

Leslie Carol Botha: Targeting women for HPV when men carry the virus is another gender scam.  Vaccinating college girls is dangerous at best.  Most women have been exposed to HPV by this time in their lives.  What is not being told is that if a woman has already been exposed to HPV and then gets vaccinated her chances of cervical cancer increase. We are already seeing this in the adolescent population.

University of Florida uses grant money to entice more girls to get HPV vaccine

Natural News
Thursday, June 28, 2012 by: J. D. Heyes
You’ve no doubt heard scores of stories about how organizations, businesses, research facilities and learning institutions abuse free money, spending it on bizarre pet projects.

Add the University of Florida to that list.

The home of the Gators says it wants to use a $150,000 grant from the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine to increase the vaccination rate of the human papillomavirus among young girls.

What is human papillomavirus? It is a virus that is responsible for a rapidly growing type of oral cancer, and is most often sexually transmitted. It is also the same virus that causes genital warts and cervical cancer.

Free to women on Medicaid and the state’s equivalent for younger females, Florida KidCare, the university wants to use your tax money to vaccinate girls (nothing was said about vaccinating young men) against genital and oral complications tied to HPV. What’s odd about that is that recent studies show men are three times more likely than women to develop oral HPV.

Vaccine inequalities?

“By 2020, there will be more HPV-positive oral cancers among men than cervical cancers among women in the U.S., and right now we don’t even have a way to screen for them,” says Maura L. Gillison, MD, PhD, of Ohio State University, according to a study she led published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association. But, she notes, “Our data provides evidence that oral HPV infection is predominantly sexually transmitted.”

Think reckless self-gratification.

According to local media reports, the university’s Dr. Stephanie Staras, assistant professor in the college’s department of health outcomes and policy, who is serving as the principle investigator for the project, said it will focus on reaching young women to increase their awareness about the vaccine – the only one that has been developed to protect against cancer – and perhaps prompt more health care providers to recommend the vaccine.

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.