HPV Vaccines: What exactly are they effective against?

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Since HPV vaccines have not been proven to prevent cancer, the CDC lists three alternate ways to judge the vaccines’ efficacy. None of them work. Where does that leave medical consumers?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRLog (Press Release) Mar 19, 2011 – According to the prescribing information packet, GARDASIL is a vaccine indicated in girls and women 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of the following diseases caused by Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types included in the vaccine:

•   Cervical, vulvar, and vaginal cancer caused by HPV types 16 and 18
•   Genital warts (condyloma acuminata) caused by HPV types 6 and 11
•   And the following precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18:
•   Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2/3 and Cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS)
•   Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1
•   Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) grade 2 and grade 3
•   Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN) grade 2 and grade 3

GARDASIL is indicated in boys and men 9 through 26 years of age for the prevention of genital warts (condyloma acuminata) caused by HPV types 6 and 11.

The prescribing information packet for Gardasil’s competitor states: CERVARIX® is indicated for the prevention of the following diseases caused by oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 [see Clinical Studies (14)]:

•     Cervical cancer
• Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse and adenocarcinoma in situ, and
•     Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1.

CERVARIX is approved for use in females 10 through 25 years of age.

Examine the facts. Neither vaccine has been proven to prevent cancer. The CDC says, “While there are well-established cancer registries in the United States, it will take decades before the impact of vaccine on cervical cancer is observed. More proximal measures of vaccine impact include outcomes such as prevalence of HPV vaccine types, incidence of cervical precancers and genital warts.”

HPV Prevalence:  HPV tests currently available to American medical consumers generate both false positive and false negative reports. (See this report for verification.)

Unless a test is approved for general use that uses HPV short-targeting DNA sequencing (See reliable gentyping), HPV prevalence cannot be accurately monitored to determine vaccine efficacy.
Precancerous lesions:  In the natural history of cervical cancer development only a small fraction of the CIN 2 lesions will progress to CIN 3 lesions; and only a small fraction of CIN 3 lesions will progress to cervical cancer. Theoretically, you cannot have cervical cancer without first having various grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, when most of these lesions reverse on their own, it is hardly an accurate way to determine efficacy of a ‘cancer’ vaccine.Genital Warts:  There are few reports of the rates of genital warts in the United States prior to 2000. The current statistical reports are primarily gathered from STD clinics in larger cities throughout the United States. These are then extrapolated to estimate the rates for the rest of the country. With no accurate baseline to compare to, genital warts are not an adequate judge of vaccine efficacy either.

The only way left to monitor HPV vaccine efficacy is to determine whether the vaccine-related genotypes decline after vaccination. Without a reliable short target DNA sequencing test available to the general medical consumer, this is not possible.

This leaves people having to trust the authorities and wait for decades to see if HPV vaccines actually reduce the incidence of cervical cancer. The SaneVax Team believes this is not a viable option.

The CDC stressed the importance of post-vaccination HPV monitoring. Medical consumers need to know if they have been exposed to a vaccine-relevant HPV before vaccination not only to avoid potential serious side effects, but to avoid wasting their precious health care dollars on a vaccine that will do nothing for them if they have already been exposed.

Consider the following to results of searches of the VAERS database:

•   106 reports of anogenital warts found after HPV vaccination
•   222 reports of papillomavirus infections found after HPV vaccination
•   29 reports of cervical cancer after HPV vaccination

The VAERS database has its limitations, but for now it is the only adverse event reference source available to the public. The reports above may be related to HPV genotypes not included in the vaccines. Then again, they may be caused by the same genotypes included in the vaccines. Without proper DNA sequencing, no one will ever know.

When a vaccine has no proven efficacy against the disease it is intended to prevent, no risk to the consumer is acceptable.

Sources:

1. http://sanevax.org/research-blog/?p=14
2.http://sanevax.org/research-blog/?p=245
3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12636951?dopt=Abstrac …
4.https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=da396b97ad6eb7ec4f7d511f85d9e325&tab=core&_cview=0
5.http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TD4-4YG779B-7&_user=10&_coverDate=07%2F05%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=9a3ce45a9544f0f9c3

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.