It’s your right as a parent to decide whether to vaccinate

Newark Advocate

BY BEKAH SAGAR • July 25, 2010

Childhood vaccination is a loaded topic. Non-celebrities who question this practice are labeled ignorant, fanatical or a threat to the common good. Why is this? I watch what goes into my kids’ bellies; why not what is expected to be injected into their bodies? Vaccines might be linked to allergies, neurological damage and other chronic illnesses in children; I examine them closely.

Foods and refined oils used in vaccine manufacturing, such as shellfish, peanut oil, egg, gelatin and casein, are becoming “highly allergic” to more and more kids. Injecting peanut oil (unlabeled in certain vaccines), for instance, bypasses protein modification during digestion and can create anaphylactic response. Food allergy rates in children went up 18 percent from 1997 to 2007 (vactruth.com). Could excessive vaccination play a part?

We don’t feed babies solid food until 4 months because of the risk of food passing through their undeveloped gut into the bloodstream and creating allergies. Yet through vaccination, we inject harmful substances and diseased animal matter directly into a child’s bloodstream starting at 2 months. Is this the way to prevent disease? Disease always will be a part of our world — acquiring natural immunity is important. Before the 1940s, when vaccines were introduced on a widespread basis, deaths from various diseases already were declining dramatically.

Whether or not vaccines helped in the past, they have grown out of control. Children in our country receive a massive amount of vaccines by kindergarten: 114 in 33 shots (newswith views.com). 23 shots are administered before the age of 2 (cdc.gov). Are so many vaccines really necessary, or do the drug and medical industries profit at our kids’ expense?

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.