Mothers key to college-age women receiving HPV vaccine

PHYSORG.com

January 3, 2011 by Jeff Grabmeier

Even after young women reach adulthood, their mothers can play a key role in convincing them to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, new research suggests.

A study found that college-aged women were more likely to say they had received the if they had talked to their mother about it.

“Mothers talking to their daughters were an important factor in whether young women were vaccinated,” said Janice Krieger, lead author of the study and assistant professor of communication at Ohio State University.

“It is an encouraging finding, because it shows that communication between mothers and daughters can be very helpful, even if it may be difficult sometimes.”

Many mothers and daughters may be uncomfortable talking about the HPV , because it is designed to prevent the spread of a sexually-transmitted virus, Krieger said.

But regardless of the difficulty in talking about it, the vaccine is important because a persistent HPV infection may cause cancer. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and will infect about half of sexually active people in the United States during their lifetimes.

The study appears in the January 2011 issue of the journal Human Communication Research.

The exploratory research involved 182 mother-daughter pairs. All of the daughters were college students, with an average age of 20.

The daughters mailed a questionnaire about the HPV vaccine to their mothers, and completed a similar questionnaire for themselves.

Overall, 137 of the mother-daughter pairs had talked about the HPV vaccine, and 45 pairs reporting not discussing the vaccine.

Results showed that the key for daughters getting the vaccine was having mothers who discussed the HPV vaccine with their daughter and who reported believing that the vaccine was safe and effective in preventing HPV-related diseases.

Fears about susceptibility to HPV and about the severity of HPV-caused illness — on the parts of mothers or daughters — were not related to whether they talked about the issue.

“Fear does not seem to be the motivator,” Krieger said. “It really depends on the mothers believing that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective and that they have the ability to discuss this topic with their daughters.”

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My response….

I beg to disagree. I am aware of 20,500 parents whose daughters have been adversely affected by the HPV vaccines – many of them seriously and forced to drop out of school or college because of “new medical conditions.” Not to mention another 94 parents whose daughters have died. I am sure they will disagree as well.

These figures come from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). It is estimated that only 1 to 10% of the population is reporting.

For more information about the dangers of the HPV vaccines go to: SANEVax.org or TruthAboutGardasil.org

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.