Race and Ethnicity and Cervical Cancer

Cervical Cancer: Compare by Race and Ethnicity

Related Information: Compare by State

Recent trends suggest that cervical cancer incidence and mortality among women in some racial and ethnic populations in the United States continue to decrease significantly; however, rates are considerably higher among Hispanic and African-American women.1

Rate of Cervical Cancer by Race and Ethnicity

“Incidence rate” means how many women out of a given number get the disease each year. In the United States, the following numbers of women were told that they had cervical cancer in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available:

  • 11,999 women overall
  • 9,369 white women
  • 1,973 Hispanic women
  • 1,794 African-American women
  • 501 Asian/Pacific Islander women
  • 85 American Indian/Alaska Native women

The graph below shows how many women out of 100,000 got cervical cancer each year during the years 1975–2005. The cervical cancer incidence rate is grouped by race and ethnicity.

Cervical Cancer
SEER Incidence Rates* by Race and Ethnicity, U.S., 1975–2005

Line chart showing the changes in cervical cancer incidence rates for women of various races and ethnicities from 1975 to 2005.

Incidence source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, National Cancer Institute (NCI) 1975–1991 = SEER 9; 1992–2005 = SEER 13.
*Rates are per 100,000 and are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population (19 age groups – Census P25-1130). Rates for American Indians/Alaska Natives are not displayed because fewer than 16 cases were reported for at least one year within the time interval.
Hispanics are not mutually exclusive from whites, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Incidence data for Hispanics are based on NHIA and exclude cases from the Alaska Native Registry.

Deaths from Cervical Cancer by Race and Ethnicity

From 1975–2005, the cervical cancer death rate in the U.S. varied by race and ethnicity. The following numbers of U.S. women died from cervical cancer in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available:

  • 3,924 women overall
  • 2,982 white women
  • 783 African-American women
  • 447 Hispanic women
  • 125 Asian/Pacific Islander women
  • 34 American Indian/Alaska Native women

The graph below shows the death rates in the U.S. for cervical cancer from 1975–2005 by race and ethnicity.

Cervical Cancer
Death Rates* by Race and Ethnicity, U.S., 1975–2005

Line chart showing the changes in cervical cancer death rates for women of various races and ethnicities from 1975 to 2005.

Mortality source: U.S. Mortality Files, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC.
*Rates are per 100,000 and are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population (19 age groups – Census P25-1130). Rates for American Indians/Alaska Natives are not displayed because fewer than 16 cases were reported for at least one year within the time interval.
Hispanics are not mutually exclusive from whites, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Mortality data for Hispanics do not include cases from Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Vermont.

Reference

1U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2005 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report. Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute; 2009. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/uscs.

Page last reviewed: January 14, 2009
Page last updated: January 14, 2009
Content source: Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

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Author: H. Sandra Chevalier-Batik

I started the Inconvenient Woman Blog in 2007, and am the product of a long line of inconvenient women. The matriarchal line is French-Canadian, Roman Catholic, with a very feisty Irish great-grandmother thrown in for sheer bloody mindedness. I am a research analyst and author who has made her living studying technical data, and developing articles, training materials, books and web content. Tracking through statistical data, and oblique cross-references to find the relevant connections that identifies a problem, or explains a path of action, is my passion. I love clearly delineating the magic questions of knowledge: Who, What, Why, When, Where and for How Much, Paid to Whom. My life lessons: listen carefully, question with boldness, and personally verify the answers. I look at America through the appreciative eyes of an immigrant, and an amateur historian; the popular and political culture is a ceaseless fascination. I have no impressive initials after my name. I’m merely an observer and a chronicler, an inconvenient woman who asks questions, and sometimes encourages others to look at things differently.