Will New Pap Test Guidelines Result in Delayed Administration of Gardasil?

Finding Dulcinea

November 20, 2009 04:30 PM
by James Sullivan
New screening guidelines for cervical cancer say girls can wait until age 21 to begin Pap tests, though it is unclear how these recommendations will impact current HPV vaccination guidelines.
The guidelines released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) encourage a shift toward less cervical cancer screening among women. In addition to delaying a woman’s first Pap test to the age of 21, the new guidelines recommend less frequent testing thereafter—once every two years until age 30.

The changes were made due to the rarity of contracting cervical cancer before the age of 21, and to avoid over-treatment and complications from the test. According to the ACOG, “Moving the baseline cervical screening to age 21 is a conservative approach to avoid unnecessary treatment of adolescents which can have economic, emotional, and future childbearing implications. … Although the rate of HPV infection is high among sexually active adolescents, invasive cervical cancer is very rare in women under age 21.”

Pap Test Guidelines and Gardasil

The guidelines released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) encourage a shift toward less cervical cancer screening among women. In addition to delaying a woman’s first Pap test to the age of 21, the new guidelines recommend less frequent testing thereafter—once every two years until age 30.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.