BPA Passed In-Utero to Fetal Liver

Holy Hormones Honey! What we suspected to be the worst – is the worst.  BPA – estrogen mimickers from our environment (plastics) are being passed in-utero to fetal livers.   What does that mean? Early puberty – and hormone imbalance anxiety, depression, weight gain;  estrogen dominance symptoms in girls and boys – even before their endocrine systems can start functioning on their own. I disagree with the statement that BPA is eliminated by adults…  Diabetes, obesity, anxiety, depression are becoming rampant in our society. Add BPA to synthetic estrogen’s in birth control and you have a Pandora’s Box of health issues that are paramount.

Study Shows BPA Exposure in Fetal Livers

ScienceDaily
Dec. 3, 2012

New research from the University of Michigan School of Public Health found BPA, or bisphenol A, in fetal liver tissue, demonstrating that there is considerable exposure to the chemical during pregnancy.

Researchers also found a proportionately higher concentration of free BPA — as opposed to the conjugated forms modified by the body for elimination — further showing that in fetuses the ability to eliminate the chemical from the body is not the same as in adults.

“The general message from our research is that people have to be cognizant of the fact that the adult body may be able to deal with a particular exposure but a developing fetus may not,” said Muna Nahar, doctoral student in the School of Public Health’s Department of Environmental Health Sciences and first author on the paper.

Previous animal studies have associated BPA with breast and prostate cancer, and reproductive and behavioral abnormalities. Some research on effects to human health has tied BPA to cardiovascular disease, miscarriage, decreased semen quality and childhood behavioral issues. The chemical also may impact metabolism, diabetes and obesity, although more studies are required to determine its effects.

Prior research on BPA — a chemical used in many consumer products, including plastic bottles and metal food and beverage cans — has measured concentrations of the chemical in urine. About 95 percent of those who have been tested in a nationally representative health survey study show some level of BPA, but the research to date had yet to firmly establish the presence of the chemical in tissues.

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