Hormone gel could regrow teeth cavities

NaturalNews

Monday, December 06, 2010 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
A new hormone gel that may stimulate teeth to grow back the tissue destroyed by tooth decay, according to a study conducted by researchers from the National Institute for Health and Medical Research in Paris and published in the American Chemical Society’s journal ACS Nano.

The gel is composed of a mix of melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and the drug-transporting chemical poly-L-glutamic acid. MSH causes the body to produce more melanin, responsible for skin color. Recent research has suggested that it can also stimulate bone regrowth.

In studies conducted on human dental cells, the MSH gel led to the growth of new dental cells and their adhesion to existing cells. When the gel was applied to the decaying teeth of live mice, the cavities completely disappeared within one month.

It will take at least three to five years to develop the gel into a medical product. If all goes well, the gel may render dental drills obsolete. The researchers believe that because the gel stimulates the regrowth of the body’s own cells, the rebuilt teeth would be just as strong as the old ones — in contrast with artificial fillings, which can fall out or wear down. The gel would also be painless to apply and would not require anesthesia.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.