Weight Linked to Complications in Some Hysterectomy Patients

U.S. News & World Report
Health Day

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) — Compared with normal weight women, obese women are more likely to experience bleeding and infections during and after a hysterectomy, a new study indicates.

Researchers in Denmark analyzed data from 20,353 women who had a hysterectomy to treat non-cancerous conditions such as abnormal bleeding during menstruation, benign muscle tumors and pain.

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Women with a body-mass index (BMI) of 30 or more were three times more likely to experience heavy bleeding during surgery than normal weight women (BMI of 20 to 25). BMI is a measurement score that takes into account a person’s height and weight.

Obese women also had a one-third increased risk for all bleeding complications (bleeding either during or after surgery, or hematoma — where bleeding has occurred and collected) and a one-half increased risk of infection.

Further investigation revealed that some of this increased risk was influenced by the type of surgery.

“We found that the increased risk of all bleeding complications and infection associated with a high BMI were only seen in women who underwent an abdominal hysterectomy, and it was not seen in those who had either a vaginal or laparoscopic hysterectomy. Obese women who had an abdominal hysterectomy had one and a half times the risk compared with women of the recommended BMI,” Merete Osler, a consultant physician and professor of clinical databases in the Research Center for Prevention and Health and Glostrup University Hospital, said in a journal news release.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.