Hormones in Balance is a Rhythmic Body Symphony

Holy Hormones Honey! Dr. Mokhtar has written a beautiful and informative article.  In order for women’s bodies to perform at their most optimum level, the hormones need to be balanced. The endocrine system is a sacred and beautiful orchestration for hormone harmony.  Another integral aspect and the crux of my body of work is what I call, Female Mystique The Three Phases of Eve. If women want to experience hormone harmony – they first need to learn how to dance to the music – or in other words learn how to live with the rhythm of the symphony.

A symphony of hormones

The Star Online
Malaysia

Sunday August 5, 2012

WOMEN’S WORLD
By DR NORASHIKIN MOKHTAR

We need to maintain the balance between all the hormones in our body to stay in good health, and to prevent diseases from developing.

REGULAR readers of this column will know that I write about hormones quite frequently. It is a topic that is close to my heart because I strongly believe that

If the body is under persistent ‘attack’ by stress factors – perhaps due to unresolved problems in your life or a medical condition – you will suffer from adrenal fatigue.

hormones are central in ensuring that all the functions and processes in the body run smoothly.

Hormonal balance is a complex subject because there are so many hormones in our body and we are still learning new things about their relationship with each other.

In this article, I will try to provide a basic understanding of what we call the hormone symphony – the harmony between many different hormones, each playing a different tune, but coming together to create a well-balanced melody.

Feeling off-balance

Many people think that hormones are something that only women need to think about, or that they only affect us during menstruation or pregnancy.

If the body is under persistent ‘attack’ by stress factors – perhaps due to unresolved problems in your life or a medical condition – you will suffer from adrenal fatigue.

In fact, hormones – in both women and men – have many important functions in all the organs, affecting all aspects of our physical and mental health.

What makes hormones unique is that they work in tandem with each other – they send messages to each other and to the organs that they control, constantly telling each other whether to release more or less.

There are many conditions that can interfere with the normal functions or production of a hormone. If you are in a situation where you have too much or too little of a hormone, or it is unable to send signals to other parts of the body, this can disrupt the balance of everything in the body.

Hormone imbalance can produce a whole host of symptoms in women, many of which we sometimes ignore or mistake for other conditions.

Signs like fatigue, weight gain, insomnia, hot or cold sweats, migraines and headaches, hair loss, low libido, depression and irritability could point to hormone imbalance.

While many of these are non-specific symptoms, you and your doctor should suspect a hormone problem if there are no other physical conditions that could be the cause.

Feeling off-balance

Many people think that hormones are something that only women need to think about, or that they only affect us during menstruation or pregnancy.

If the body is under persistent ‘attack’ by stress factors – perhaps due to unresolved problems in your life or a medical condition – you will suffer from adrenal fatigue.

In fact, hormones – in both women and men – have many important functions in all the organs, affecting all aspects of our physical and mental health.

What makes hormones unique is that they work in tandem with each other – they send messages to each other and to the organs that they control, constantly telling each other whether to release more or less.

Read Full Article…

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.