93% of Nigerian Girls Experience Menstrual Pain

Holy Hormones Honey! Hormone imbalance is a global issue. It is disheartening to read that women in developing countries are having so many menstrual problems. Combination of synthetic hormone use, lack of nutrition for proper endocrine system support and environmental toxins.  Wonder how many generations of developing world women have been exposed to synthetic hormone birth control products? What women are not told is that these birth control methods deplete nutrients.  If they are not replaced then a myriad of other problems occur from menstrual migraines to painful periods.

Coping with menstrual pains

BUSINESSDAY
Nigeria
Saturday, 28 July 2012
Okeoghene Oghenekaro /NA

Rita’s schooling was interrupted periodically due to painful and heavy bleeding during her menstruation. The assistance rendered by her parents and the school authorities did not reduce the nightmare of the 16-year-old student.

“Whenever my period starts, I have a lot of pains, it is almost impossible for me to go to school. I just stay at home, my mum gives me pain reliever and I sleep.

“Sometimes I will not go to school for two days because of the pains and the heavy bleeding, which usually reduces after the second day. ”

Tinu Adebayo, a 27-year old civil servant has been queried on few occasions for lateness due to painful menstruation and heavy bleeding.

“I explained my predicament to my boss but he refused to bear with me.

“I have been experiencing severe menstrual pains, accompanied with heavy bleeding and vomiting since my undergraduate days. Then it was easy to skip classes and just stay and rest in the hostel.

“Now, my boss is very difficult and has given me a couple of queries for not coming to work for a day or two. But this is a situation I cannot help for now.

“If I have to go to work, I can hardly get anything done, because I feel very weak and irritated even after I must have taken some pain relief”.

Dr Maxwell Odiegwu, a gynaecologist, says menstrual pain has no cure, but can reduce when childbearing begins.

“It is more of control measure than finding a cure for dysmenorrhea, and there is a possibility that the pain may reduce, especially once childbearing starts, but it is not absolute.

Experts define dysmenorrhea as difficult menstrual flow or painful menstruation and may coexist with excessive blood loss, known as menorrhagia.

Dysmenorrhea is one of the most common gynaecological complaints among female adolescents and young adults with a prevalence of 93 per cent.

 

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.