Ginger Reduces Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy and Relieves Menstrual Pain

Natural News

April 2, 2009

(NaturalNews) Ginger, that aromatic root that has livened up food for centuries, is a treasure chest of health benefits that keep bodies lively too. Recent research has found ginger to be effective for reducing the nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy, and the pain associated with menstruation. It has also shown ginger to be effective against colon cancer and the devastating effects of liver cancer.

A daily dose of ginger makes pregnant women feel much better

Sixty-seven women receiving prenatal treatment at a clinic were the subjects of a study reported in the March 15 edition of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. Each had complained of nausea and vomiting as a result of pregnancy. The women were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group received 250 mg capsules of ginger to be taken four times a day for four days, and the control group received placebos with the same prescriptive form and direction. Effects of treatment for nausea were evaluated twice daily for four days by a before-and-after treatment questionnaire. The ginger users demonstrated a higher rate of improvement compared to the placebo users (85% versus 56%). The decrease in vomiting times among ginger uses was also significantly greater than among the women who received the placebo (50% versus 9%).

Ginger halts menstrual pain as effectively as drugs

Another study compared the effects of ginger, ibuprofen, and mefenamic acid (another NSAID typically used to treat menstrual discomfort) on women with primary menstrual pain. This was a double blind comparative clinical trial conducted over a six month period. Participants were 150 students, aged 18 years and older, who were divided into three equal groups. Students in the ginger group took 250 mg capsules of ginger rhizome powder four times a day for three days from the start of their menstrual periods. Members of the other groups received 250 mg mefenamic acid capsules or 400 mg ibuprofen capsules on the same protocol. A verbal multidimensional scoring system assessed the severity of their menstrual pain.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.