Can Hysterectomies Spread Uterine Cancer?

Holy Hormones Journal:New cancer fears for women who have experienced a type of hysterectomy that involves ‘morcellation’ – a method of splitting open the uterus with a power tool. Common sense would dictate that opening the uterus after cancer cells have been detected is like opening Pandora’s box. Doctors are now calling for a ban on this procedure. But once again too little, too late for too many women.

MET-AJ-MORCELLATOR

(Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times/MCT)

The photo of the woman on the right is of Martha Montalvo-Ariri, who is now battling cancer after a morcellation procedure that has spread an undetected cancer during a routine hysterectomy. She had the procedure, on June 30, 2014. This mother of four was not provided with enough information to make an informed decision. The risks of having a morcellation procedure were never explained to her. According to Martha, “They said it was in and out, very easy, and you’re back to your life. Instead, they took my life away.”

I have read similar findings about breast cancer and biopsies. Is it possible that needle biopsies also promote and spread cancer cells?  Doesn’t that make sense as well? According to Natural Health 365 – “..there are a substantial number of reports that claim the spread of malignant cells  following a breast cancer biopsy.”

There are a substantial number of reports that claim the spread of malignant cells can follow a breast tumor biopsy. This has been reported for lung, thyroid, brain and pancreatic tumor biopsies as well. – See more at: http://www.naturalhealth365.com/natural_healing/biopsy.html#sthash.gKcmF7rP.dpuf
There are a substantial number of reports that claim the spread of malignant cells can follow a breast tumor biopsy. This has been reported for lung, thyroid, brain and pancreatic tumor biopsies as well. – See more at: http://www.naturalhealth365.com/natural_healing/biopsy.html#sthash.gKcmF7rP.dpuf
There are a substantial number of reports that claim the spread of malignant cells can follow a breast tumor biopsy. This has been reported for lung, thyroid, brain and pancreatic tumor biopsies as well. – See more at: http://www.naturalhealth365.com/natural_healing/biopsy.html#sthash.gKcmF7rP.dpuf

Women’s Wisdom: Listen to your intuition. If something does not feel right or sound right – or make sense – question it.
Research it. Get a second opinion. Demand a full disclosure before you sign an informed consent form.  Know the risks. Weigh the risks against the benefits. Ask your physician – would you have this procedure?

If you have concerns about your hysterectomy – take the time to fill out this survey at Hormones Matter – Real Data – Real Women – Real Solutions

Common hysterectomy procedure may spread uterine cancer

CBS News
By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay
July 22, 2014, 6:25 PM

Removing the uterus with a minimally invasive procedure known as morcellation carries a risk of spreading undetected cancer, and now a new study pinpoints the likelihood more clearly.

Twenty-seven of every 10,000 women who had the technique had undetected uterine cancer at the time of the procedure, researchers found, with the odds being highest for patients over the age of 65.

Surgeons performing a hysterectomy with morcellation use a power cutter to slice uterine tissue into smaller fragments, and then remove those fragments through small incisions in the abdomen via a tube or laparoscope.

“With this procedure, you are breaking up the uterus,” said study researcher Dr. Jason Wright, chief of gynecologic oncology at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.

“You are essentially cutting through a cancer [if it is present] and that could theoretically spread the cancer to outside the uterus,” he explained.

That risk is not present when the uterus is removed intact, as in a conventional hysterectomy, he said.

Read full article…

 

Statistics on Hysterectomy and Morcellationuterine-morcellators-78958-157209

  • Hysterectomy is the 2nd most common surgery among women in the United States
  • By age 70, one out of three American women will have had a hysterectomy
  • 90% of these surgeries are done to remove Fibroids (non-cancerous tumors found in the uterus)
  • The average life span following accidental morcellation of sarcoma is only 24-36 months
  • Only 15% of women who have leiomyosarcoma (LMS) that has spread (stage 4) will be alive after 5 years
  • Women with sarcoma who are morcellated are about 4 times more likely to die from sarcoma than if they had not been morcellated

 Source:
American Recall Center

Related Articles

Morcellation: Could There Be a More Foolhardy Technique? Hormones Matter, by 

Hysterectomy in America – Hormones Matter, by

 

 


We also have some great information about the device and it’s dangers on our Power Morcellator page.

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.