Study: Ovulation, Status and Money

Holy Hormones Journal: Well, Holy Hormones Honey! No wonder women have a hard time getting a long with each other. Very interesting study on how changes in the menstrual cycle affect women’s behaviors not only to other women – but with men as well. Not sure how to comment on this… but I will ask this… How do birth control pills affect women’s behaviors? Are we as competitive with other women… probably not since ovulation is suppressed.

Might be very helpful information for women working with women ‘superiors’.

Another question  – is this ingrained behavior or learned behavior due to the feelings of a lack of control in this male-dominated/patriarchal society?

Research shows ovulation motivates women to outdo other women

Press Release
February 26, 2014

Ovulatory cycle changes women’s economic behavior to focus more on social standing relative to other women

Kristina Durante

Kristina Durante, University of Texas at San Antonio

For approximately one week every month, millions of women change their economic behavior and become more focused on their social standing relative to other women. According to new research from The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, the ovulatory cycle alters women’s behavior by subconsciously motivating them to outdo other women. This research could have important implications for marketers, consumers and researchers.

The researchers conducted three studies, one of which had ovulating and nonovulating women play the “dictator game.” In this popular economic experiment, a person is given a fixed amount of money that she can choose to share with another person.”

We found that ovulating women were much less willing to share when the other person was another woman. They became meaner to other women,” said Kristina Durante, assistant professor of marketing at the UTSA College of Business and lead author of the study.

Whereas nonovulating women shared about 50 percent of the money with another woman, ovulating women shared only half as much, keeping the rest of the cash for themselves.

In another study, women made product choices that could either maximize their individual gains or maximize their relative gains compared to other women. For example, women indicated if they preferred to have a $25,000 car while other women got $40,000 cars (Option A) or have a $20,000 car while other women got $12,000 cars (Option B). The study found that ovulating women preferred Option B, choosing products that would give them higher standing compared to other women.

“What’s interesting about this finding is that ovulating women are so concerned about their relative position that they are willing to take less for themselves just so that they could outdo other women,” said study coauthor Vladas Griskevicius, associate professor of marketing at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management.

But the studies find that ovulation doesn’t always make women want more status. When women played against a man rather than a woman in the dictator game, the researchers found an even more surprising result. Whereas ovulating women became meaner to women, they became nicer to men. While nonovulating women shared about 45 percent of the money with a man, ovulating women gave 60 percent of the money to the man.

Read full article…

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Ovulation motivates women to outdo other women, research shows

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.