Study ties hot flashes to lower breast cancer risk

USA Today

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Updated Jan 29, 2011 1:00 PM

Here’s some good news for women ever bothered by hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms: Your risk for breast cancer may be reduced as much as 50%, researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle report.

“We know that hormones are important to breast cancer risk, and we also know that menopausal symptoms occur primarily because of changes in hormones that women experience as they go through menopause,” said lead author and breast cancer epidemiologist Dr. Christopher I. Li.

Now, for the first time, he said researchers looked at the relationship between menopause symptoms and breast cancer risk.

“If we can confirm this finding, it may be somewhat of a silver lining for women who experience menopausal symptoms, because they can often really reduce a woman’s quality of life,” he said.

For the study, published in the Jan. 26 online edition of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Li’s team questioned to 1,437 postmenopausal women, 988 of whom had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

The women, who were between 55 and 74 years old, were asked about menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, vaginal dryness, irregular or heavy menstrual bleeding, depression and anxiety.

The researchers found that women who had the most hot flashes had a very low risk of developing breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death among U.S. women.

In fact, for women with the most severe menopausal symptoms, the relative risk of developing either of the two most common breast cancers — invasive ductal and invasive lobular carcinoma — was lowered an average of 50%, compared to women who reported no menopausal symptoms.

In 2002, a major U.S. study on hormone replacement therapy (estrogen and progestin) was halted early because of an increased risk in breast cancer risk for the women taking the hormones. Li said that since it’s known that estrogen and progesterone play a role in breast cancer, reduction of these hormones, which trigger the most severe menopausal symptoms, might be protective, Li said.

Moreover, the association between menopausal symptoms and the risk for breast cancer remained even after taking into account other factors, such as weight and use of hormone replacement therapy, Li noted.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.