Menstrual disorder: The new silent killer

Daily Sun

Nigeria

Stories by AZOMA CHIKWE
Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Endometriosis implants can occur outside the pelvis, on the liver, in old surgery scars, and even in or around the lining or brain. These implants, while they can cause problems, are benign or not cancerous. Briefing the press in commemoration of this year’s Endometriosis Month (March), Managing Director of Nordica Fertility Centre, Dr Abayomi Ajayi disclosed that the exact prevalence of endometriosis is not known, since many women may have the condition and have no symptoms. It is estimated to affect over one million women in the United States.

He further stated that most cases of endometriosis are diagnosed in women aged around 25-35 years and has been reported in girls as young as 11 years of age. According to him, “endometriosis is coined from two words, ‘Endo and Metra’ meaning ‘Inside and Womb’. Endometriosis is the growth of cells similar to those that form the inside of the uterus (endometrial cells), but in a location outside the uterus.

Endometriosis cells are the same cells that are shed each month during menstruation. The cells of endometriosis attach themselves to tissue outside the uterus and are called “implants”. These implants are most commonly found on the ovaries, the fallopian tunes, outer surfaces of the uterus or intestines, and on the surface lining of the pelvic cavity, they can also be found in the vagina, cervix and bladder.

“Rarely, endometriosis implants can occur outside the pelvis, on the liver, in old surgery, and even in or around the lung or brain. These implants, while they can cause problems are benign (not cancerous).
“Endometriosis affects women in their reproductive years. The exact prevalence of endometriosis is not known, since many women may have the condition and have no symptoms. It is estimated to affect over one million women (estimates range from 3 percent to 18 percent of women) in the United States. Most cases of endometriosis are diagnosed in women aged around 25-35 years. It has been reported in girls as young as 11 years of age. It is rare in postmenopausal women. It runs in families and delaying pregnancy until an older age is also believed to increase the risk of developing endometriosis.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.