A Simple Equation: Linking #Gluten to Infertility

Holy Hormones Journal:04.08.15 infertility2Gluten – inflammation – autoimmunity = infertility. A simple equation – with so many implications for unsuspecting women – who then resort to therapy and expensive, time consuming and disheartening fertility treatments.  A week of so ago, I posted another article linking autoimmunity to the rise in still births… discussing how doctors are developing a treatment targeted at the immune system so it does not attack the fetus.

But by then the damage has been done… because if the immune system sees the fetus as a foreign invader – it is trying to protect itself from further onslaught – and an ‘invader’ that is further depleting immune health.

Why? Because we are immune-compromised and nutrient deficient. We do not need more therapies – we need to heal our bodies. There are many inflammatory agents that we ingest – everything from synthetic hormones to medications, to vaccines, and now our food sources. There is a tipping point – just as in heavy metal exposure and autism, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s, and cancer  It is the body’s way of saying…. cannot handle this any more.  The cumulative sum of the inflammation is greater than the what the body can handle. A simple equation really. With our fertility at stake.

Should You Give Up Gluten if You’re Trying to Get Pregnant?04.08.15 gluten and pregnancy

It might be causing inflammation.

Redbook Magazine
April 1, 2015

By

Bread, pasta, beer, and cereal—these are just a few of my favorite things. (What can I say? I’m a carb-loving kind of girl.) It’s nearly impossible to imagine giving up gluten, but recent research shows that doing so just might be the missing link for why it’s been so hard for me to get (and stay) pregnant. Wondering if these findings might have relevance for you, too? Read on.

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology in January found that women with infertility have more than triple the odds of having celiac disease in tandem, and for those with unexplained infertility, the odds skyrocket to six times higher[JJ1] . “There’s a lot of data coming out that points the finger at diet and gluten for potentially impacting our patients’ opportunity for pregnancy,” says Dr. Paul Bergh, co-founder of Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey. “It’s a really hot topic right now.”

Where does the connection come in? Bergh explains it like this: when someone has celiac disease, the gut has an “inflammatory response” to gluten and makes antibodies to deal with it. According to Bergh, those antibodies can not only affect the way blood vessels form in the uterus, but also attack the placenta. “Celiac disease can not only keep you from getting pregnant, but also affect [whether you have] a healthy pregnancy,” shares Bergh, citing low birth weight and premature birth as possible risks.

While just one percent of the population is currently diagnosed with celiac, keep in mind that another six percent (18 million people) have gluten sensitivity[JJ2] . Many people (including myself) might assume they don’t have celiac disease if they don’t have digestive reactions to gluten, but Bergh clarifies that it’s not always so black-and-white. “Celiac is a systemic disease, not just a disease of the GI tract,” he clarifies. “Most adults don’t present with gastrointestinal symptoms.”

In fact, the Celiac Disease Foundation says only one-third of people with celiac disease actually get diarrhea when they consume gluten. Among the other symptoms to watch out for: missed periods, bone or joint pain, fatigue, and unexplained iron-deficiency anemia.

Read full article…

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.