Health Care Providers Need to Address Reproductive Coercion

Holy Hormones Journal: Reproductive and contraceptive coercion is alive and well. So much so that a study points out the need for health care providers to address the issue with their patients.  I became aware of this issue many years ago in my studies when I found out that a woman was abused; kicked, beaten, assaulted more during a pregnancy than any other time in her life.

Reproductive coercion, intimate partner violence prevalent

ScienceDaily

Date:
February 26, 2014
Source:

Women & Infants Hospital

Summary:
Enough women experience reproductive coercion — male behavior to control contraception and pregnancy outcomes — that a research team now recommends health care providers address the subjects with their patients and tailor family planning discussions and recommendations accordingly. “Reproductive coercion, co-occurring with intimate partner violence, is prevalent among women seeking general obstetrics and gynecology care,” note the authors. In addition, reproductive coercion has been associated with intimate partner violence, including threats, physical injury, or sexual abuse.

Enough women experience reproductive coercion — male behavior to control contraception and pregnancy outcomes — that a abuse pregnantresearch team now recommends health care providers address the subjects with their patients and tailor family planning discussions and recommendations accordingly.

Researchers from Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island were part of a team that published “Reproductive coercion and co-occurring intimate partner violence in obstetrics and gynecology patients” in a recent issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“Reproductive coercion, co-occurring with intimate partner violence, is prevalent among women seeking general obstetrics and gynecology care,” notes Rebecca H. Allen, MD, of Women & Infants. She and Amy S. Gottlieb, MD, of the hospital’s Women’s Primary Care Center, participated in the study of 641 women ages 18 to 44, along with Chris Raker, ScD, a statistician in the hospital’s Division of Research.

Study participants completed anonymous surveys. The survey defined reproductive coercion as:

  • Pregnancy coercion, such as a male partner threatening to harm the woman physically or psychologically (with infidelity or abandonment) if she did not become pregnant
  • Birth control sabotage, such as flushing oral contraceptive pills down the toilet, intentionally breaking or removing condoms, or inhibiting a woman’s ability to obtain contraception

“This is a far too common problem in this country. A study of 9,000 women by the National Center for Injury Prevention and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicated that at least 9% of adult females in the United States have experienced reproductive coercion,” Dr. Gottlieb explains. “Such coercion could have tremendous impact on a woman’s ability to plan pregnancies or control her own fertility.”

Read full article…

FRA: Violence against women survey
EUAgencyFRA

Our sisters in the UK – are experiencing the same coercion and intimate partner violence.  I am proud to say the woman in this video is a spirit sister and colleague of many, many years.  She has become a spokeswoman on this issue in the UK and in Europe.

Related Stories

Link Found Between Intimate Partner Violence and Termination of Pregnancy

Jan. 7, 2014 — Intimate partner violence in women (sometimes referred to as domestic violence) is linked to termination of pregnancy, according to a new study. The study also found that intimate partner violence … full story

One in Six Women at Fracture Clinics Report Domestic Violence

June 11, 2013 — One in six women arriving at orthopedic fracture clinics have been victims of physical, emotional, or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner within the past year, and one in 50 arrive as … full story

Link Between Intimate Partner Violence and Depression

May 7, 2013 — Not only are women who have experienced violence from their partner (intimate partner violence) at higher risk of becoming depressed, but women who are depressed may also be at increased risk of … full story

Asking About Pregnancy Coercion and Intimate-Partner Violence Can Reduce Their Incidence, Study Finds

Aug. 30, 2010 — Specifically asking young women during visits to family planning clinics whether their partners had attempted to force them to become pregnant — a type of intimate-partner violence called … full story

Reproductive Coercion Often Is Accompanied by Physical or Sexual Violence, Study Finds

Jan. 25, 2010 — Young women and teenage girls often face efforts by male partners to sabotage birth control or coerce pregnancy — including damaging condoms and destroying contraceptives — and these efforts, … full story
PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.