Pushing Higher Doses of Bipolar Drugs on Pregnant Women

Holy Hormones Journal: This news was flying all over the Internet at the beginning of the month. This article headline was pretty shocking – Bipolar drugs lose effect during pregnancy, so women need higher doses to stay well. 

Please allow me to explains this in another way. Women are so hormonally imbalanced and nutritionally depleted during adolescence and their swiffer_pregnant_womantwenties causing hormone mood shifts – that are definitely dramatic (our hormones rise and our hormones fall). Not only can those mood shifts disrupt their lives – but also the lives of everyone else in the family.

Most women are estrogen dominant for reasons I have posted over and over again in this blog. During pregnancy progesterone levels rise – to 100’s times their normal levels –  and this is the reason why women ‘fell-good’ during those eight months. I have had women email me and say their are so miserable they are considering another pregnancy.

Say what?  Women are already hormonally imbalanced and nutritionally depleted – depressed, anxious, fatigued, moody – after a first or second pregnancy and they are considering another pregnancy

This hormone shift must change bipolar drug interactions – but stating that the levels need to be increased is ludicrous.

Do women really want to be drugged during their pregnancy?  Do they want the fetus to be drugged? Where are the outcome studies on fetal health if a pregnant women uses bipolar medication? Where are the outcome studies on higher doses of bipolar medication on fetal health?

I find it ironic that the site that posted this article is called “Counsel and Heal”.  Nutrition should be the primary treatment – medication the supplement. Your developing baby needs nutrition not medications.

Pregnant Women Need Stronger Bipolar Drugs, Study Reports

Counsel & Heal
Mental Health
November 2, 2013

Bipolar disorder is a mental condition in which people go through periods of varying moods, such as depression, extreme joy or irritation. When left untreated, the mood changes can be so dramatic, which can negatively disrupt a patient’s everyday life. Roughly 4.4 million American women are afflicted with bipolar disorder with a lot of them at childbearing age. When women are pregnant, their bodies are changing and according to a new study, pregnant women with this condition might need a prescription that is stronger than usual. Their regular doses will most likely be ineffective.

“Now physicians change the dose of the drug in response to women’s symptoms worsening,” said lead investigator Crystal Clark, M.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a psychiatrist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “We need to optimize their medication dosing so they stay well.”

Clark and her colleagues studied the blood concentration levels of pregnant women taking the drug, lamotrigine. They found that the levels were decreasing in the pregnant women. Around 50 percent of the women in the study had to drop out due to the worsening symptoms they were experiencing as a result of the reduction in blood concentration levels. The researchers explained that during pregnancy, the body’s metabolism increases, which causes drug levels to fall.

Read full article…

 

 

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.
About Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.