Study: Rise in Mortality for White Women

Holy Hormones Journal: Earlier this year, I posted and commented on a Washington Post article titled:  Six alarming health trends every woman needs to know.

The article said that even thought there was good news like a decrease in national mortality rates from breast cancer and heart disease, researchers at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research who analyzed two years worth of data announced their were other areas of concern.

Digging deeper into these disturbing issues, I found information that shows that premature deaths among Caucasian women in the US is on par with Mexico – even though we spend 10x’s as much on health care.

Premature Deaths

In addition, the WHO and UNICEF reported that even though maternal mortality rates decreased around the world – in the U.S. the rates increased by 136%. Time Magazine reported on this trend in 2012.

change_in_maternal_mortality_rate_1990_vs-_2013_chartbuilder-1

A NATION IS NOT DEFEATED UNTIL THE HEARTS OF ITS WOMEN ARE ON THE GROUND. ~ Native American Proverb

This is disturbing information at best. And although white women are being blamed for their lifestyle choices (alcohol, and drugs), there are other issues that must be considered. The big one is nutrient depletion with each passing generation coupled with the introduction of GMO foods, glyphosate which is an endocrine disruptor and coupled with BPA poisoning from plastics – especially from microwaving foods in plastic containers.

Then we cannot rule out the number of women on psychotropic medications. Especially those new moms who are being put on these types of addictive drugs right after birth – to prevent postpartum psychosis and maternal mental illness. BTW – #2 and #3 on the six “alarming” health trends in women in the U.S, are mental health and suicide.

And then of course we cannot rule out the role that synthetic hormones are playing in our lives. More and more women are dying of stroke and other cardiac related diseases on these long-term synthetic contraction. Most women are not aware these methods deplete vital nutrients from our body – just like any medication does. And if the body does not have adequate nutritional levels – anything that is synthetic is going to wreak havoc on the neuro-endocrine-immune system.

And then we can’t rule out Gardasil, the HPV vaccine. Although the vaccine has been on the market for less than 10 years, it has killed and destroyed hundreds and thousands of girls lives – who are going to be figured into the equation if they were lucky to survive the vaccine. And as the article below states ‘mortality is affecting women of reproductive and child-rearing ages.” The teen girls who were vaccinated now fall into this demographic.

In addition, autoimmune issues are on the rise among this demographic…. and for the first time the maternal body is rejecting the fetal body as a foreign invader causing a spike in still and premature births.

Can’t rule out cutting off our breasts, taking out our uterus either. The entire neuro-endocrine-immune system becomes imbalanced. Thyroid issues are out of control.

And we can’t rule out being thrown out of marriages and families…. divorced, financially devastated and jobless.

And then we can’t rule out being told that our not feeling well or having a reaction to Gardasil or synthetic hormones or to a hysterectomy or to anti-depressants is all in our head. You have heard me say this before and I will remind all of my readers again what Eve Ensler so eloquently stated in her book, “In the Body of the World,” “Hysteria is a word used to make women feel insane for knowing what they know.” What kind of psychological stress does that do for a women.

And then we can’t rule out that 1 in 3 women are sexually assaulted. Does one ever heal from that?

And then we cannot rule out that women are ignoring their hormone/endocrine/menstrual health – and having surgeries, vaccinations, during the paramenstrum when immunity is lowest.

Can’t rule out the accumulation of toxins in our bodies… from the infant formula we were fed, to the toxins in makeup, shampoos and perfumes… to hair color… to tampons and sanitary napkins. These toxins are cumulative and are passed from one generation to the next. Over 286 toxic chemicals, heavy metals and BPA have been found in the umbilical cords of infants. Do know harm? Hell, our babies are toxic before they are even born.

But let’s go ahead and blame this increase in death on our choice of using alcohol and drugs. How many women know that both are more harmful and detrimental to our health during the paramenstrum when immunity is lowest? Nope we don’t.

I for one am tired of being blamed. We have a crisis here – and if we do not get it under control… then 50% of our population will be at risk. Our daughters and granddaughters will be at risk. What are we going to do?

As I write this, my heart is grieving for my sweet sister goddess friend, Sage who passed this week of stomach cancer. My age. I am devastated. But as she said before passing she was glad to be checking out. And perhaps that is the bottom line for so many women – this reality that is not ours has become unbearable. Abhorrent. Not the reality we would have created if we had a voice or we were figured into the equation. What are we going to do…

To Understand Climbing Death Rates Among Whites, Look To Women Of Childbearing Age

Health Affairs blog
November 10, 2015
Laudan Aron, Lisa Dubay, Elaine Waxman, and Steven Martin

The news that mortality is increasing among middle-aged white Americans spread like wildfire last week (see here and here and here) thanks to a study by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who recently won the Nobel Prize in Economics. As researchers who study the social determinants of health, we were very pleased to see such widespread interest in this urgent national problem. Unfortunately, there are a couple of pieces of the puzzle that we think the Case and Deaton study missed.

By not looking at men and women separately, Case and Deaton failed to see that rising mortality is especially pronounced among women. The authors parenthetically note that “patterns are similar for men and women when analyzed separately,” but several recent studies have shown otherwise.

Two studies from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the Institute of Medicine (one of which was directed by the first author of this post) have shown that Americans are slipping behind other high-income countries when it comes to mortality and survival, and that this “US health disadvantage” has been growing particularly among women. Another study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison shows that in the decade between 1992-96 and 2002-06, female mortality rates increased in 42.8 percent of US counties. Only 3.4 percent of counties, by comparison, saw an increase in male mortality rates.

Furthermore, our own analysis of the same data used by Case and Deaton shows that the average increase in age-specific mortality rates for whites age 45-54 was more than three times higher for women than men.  More specifically, between 1999 and 2013, age-specific mortality rates for US white women age 45-54 increased by 26.8 deaths per 100,000 population, while the corresponding increase for men was 7.7 deaths.

By lumping women and men together, the study also missed the important point that the increases in mortality are affecting women of reproductive and child-rearing ages, a finding that has huge implications for children, families, and communities.

Read full article…

Chart below is from the New York Times article here.

11.15 Whitedeath1

Death rate for U.S. non-Hispanic whites (USW), U.S. Hispanics and six comparison countries, aged 45-54. (Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.)

 

PG

Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.