BPA Exposure in Puberty Causes Obesity in Girls

agressive-behaviorHoly Hormones Journal: Estrogen by any other name – in this case BPA – is still estrogen.  This study backs up my theory that menarche is the most fragile time of a woman’s life. Especially since, the authors did not find hormone related obesity in girls older than 12 or in boys in the same age group. Hormone imbalance – with too much estrogen apparently tips the scales for pre-pubescent girls – or girls entering menarche.  They are not aware that the soda they are drinking, the water from plastic bottles is upsetting their delicate endocrine system that is trying to establish its own reproductive rhythm.  Menarche  is unsettling to many girls to begin with – but to add weight and obesity on top of trying to cope with menstruation is going to severely damage these girls’ self-esteem.

Remember – BPA has not been found in their mother’s umbilical cords.  Many of these girls are born with hormone imbalances. And all of this leads to aggressive hormone outrage in this innocent y0ung girls.  Next thing you know they will be diagnosed with some disorder – and placed on psychotropic drugs.  It is time to save our Hormone Honeys from this biochemical cesspool of estrogen dominance from BPA exposure.

BPA Linked to Obesity Risk in Puberty-Age Girls

ScienceDaily
June 12, 2013

Girls between 9 and 12 years of age with higher-than-average levels of bisphenol-A (BPA) in their urine had double the risk of being obese than girls with lower levels of BPA, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

“This study provides evidence from a human population that confirms the findings from animal studies — that high BPA exposure levels could increase the risk of overweight or obesity,” said De-Kun Li, MD, PhD, principal investigator of the study and a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, Calif.

BPA is used to make plastics and other materials, such as cash register receipts. It is a known endocrine disruptor with estrogenic properties. In children and adolescents, BPA is likely to enter the body primarily through the ingestion of foods and liquids that have come into contact with BPA-containing materials, Dr. Li said.

“Girls in the midst of puberty may be more sensitive to the impacts of BPA on their energy balance and fat metabolism,” Dr. Li said. While BPA is still being examined, he said it has been shown to interfere with a body’s process of relating fat content and distribution.

The study — the first specifically designed to examine the relationship between BPA and obesity in school-age children — was conducted in Shanghai as part of a larger national study of puberty and adolescent health.

Dr. Li and colleagues studied 1,326 male and female children in grades 4 to 12 at three Shanghai schools (one elementary, one middle and one high school). In addition to urine samples collected with BPA-free materials, they obtained information on other risk factors for childhood obesity, such as dietary patterns, physical activity, mental health and family history.

The researchers found that in girls between 9 and 12 years old, a higher-than-average level of BPA in urine (2 micrograms per liter or greater) was associated with twice the risk of having a body weight in the top 10th percentile for girls of their age in the same population.

The impact was particularly pronounced among 9- to 12-year-old girls with extremely high levels of BPA in their urine (more than 10 micrograms per liter): their risk of being overweight (in the top 10th percentile) was five times greater.

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Author: Leslie Carol Botha

Author, publisher, radio talk show host and internationally recognized expert on women's hormone cycles. Social/political activist on Gardasil the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. Co-author of "Understanding Your Mood, Mind and Hormone Cycle." Honorary advisory board member for the Foundation for the Study of Cycles and member of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.